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It could happen in animals with larger families.

Originally Posted by RedPanda Originally Posted by Robittybob1 It could happen in animals with larger families. You know this may sound silly but in this case the example might be aprapo. I just cannot wrap my head around when a mutation happens and a new species is evolved just how can that happen when all there were was fish and the one amphibian. In each computer one or two bits of the machine https://essaywriterforhire.com/law-essay/
code are randomly altered.

The 44 Chromosome Man | Understanding Genetics All it takes is a female with the same malady to perpetrate a change in number. I think you are deliberately making silly statements like this even though you know the answer. His chromosomes are arranged in a stable way that could be passed on if he met a nice girl who had 44 chromosomes too. Every human is born with more than 100 new mutations. The 44 Chromosome Man | Understanding Genetics All it takes is a female with the same malady to perpetrate a change in number. The telomere fusion was an abrupt disruption of the genome. Two sexually reproducing humans have to produce approximately (7) offspring to statistically escape all the deleterious effects of mutation given that U.Formulation: offspring = 2e^U or 2e^(1.2) = 6.6 offspring The absolute truth is there are no beneficial mutations that increase the overall fitness of a organism.

Example:Most evolutionists accept a genome loading of 95% and a U=1.2. And this would certainly be possible in the future given his family history. In this case it would almost certainly result in miscarriage.

But you are an imbecile, so why should I care what bullshit you post? John Galt’s rules please! In this case it would almost certainly result in miscarriage. There might be a whole bunch of siblings all with the same mutation getting it from their mother or their father line, and they mate within the family and start the new species off like that.But for the next generation it still is line breeding from thereon in, so there must be some other mechanism that allows mating even when the parents have an unequal numbers of chromosomes.So it is a good point and I don’t know the answer. In fact, the 44 chromosome man’s family has a long history of miscarriages and spontaneous abortions. But the animals that evolved had to have had the exact DNA mutations happen at the same time so that they could mate and have offspring to further along their new species. When a program crashes it is wiped off the computer and one of the still operating programs is loaded on that machine. There might be a whole bunch of siblings all with the same mutation getting it from their mother or their father line, and they mate within the family and start the new species off like that.

Changes to speciation happen over many generations and large timescales.Think of a room full of computers, each running a similar program. Originally Posted by GTCethos Your number is wrong… stop posting via ignorance. In fact, the 44 chromosome man’s family has a long history of miscarriages and spontaneous abortions. I just cannot wrap my head around when a mutation happens and a new species is evolved just how can that happen when all there were was fish and the one amphibian. Every human is born with more than 100 new mutations.Do you think that humans from different generations are unable to have offspring?I doubt that you do.So, why do you think that animals need to have identical mutations to be able to reproduce? Ok, so if a fishs DNA mutates into an amphibian then how does a fish reproduce with that amphibian for there’s only fish and that one amphibian around not hundreds of them waiting to reproduce. Let me help you with current estimations…“Here we show that in our samples, with an average father’s age of 29.7, the average de novo mutation rate is 1.20×10−8 per nucleotide per generation. But you are an imbecile, so why should I care what bullshit you post?

Every time there are mutations there is what is called a “U” that represents a percentage of deleterious mutation. An animal having an additional chromosome does not exclude reproduction with its ‘parent’ species.For example: Down’s Syndrome involves the addition of an extra chromosome.Despite the extra chromosome, women with Down’s Syndrome are often fertile and are reproductively compatible with non-Down’s Syndrome men. These deleterious mutations must be worked out of decedents line.

Then the process of randomly altering only one or two bits of the program code is reiterated. The moment there was a transition from 48 to 46 chromosomes the hominid no longer could breed in that population. You know even the Christians get asked that same question; “If Adam and Eve had kids who were they going to breed with?” So incest must be the only way around it at times.But for the next generation it still is line breeding from thereon in, so there must be some other mechanism that allows mating even when the parents have an unequal numbers of chromosomes.So it is a good point and I don’t know the answer. The telomere fusion was an abrupt disruption of the genome. A member of a species just doesn’t whole cloth mutate into a different species. An animal having an additional chromosome does not exclude reproduction with its ‘parent’ species.For example: Down’s Syndrome involves the addition of an extra chromosome.Despite the extra chromosome, women with Down’s Syndrome are often fertile and are reproductively compatible with non-Down’s Syndrome men.

The man is sterile. It could happen in animals with larger families. Originally Posted by GTCethos Do you think that humans from different generations are unable to have offspring? https://www.ecc.edu/student-access/ I doubt that you do.So, why do you think that animals need to have identical mutations to be able to reproduce?Ok, so if a fishs DNA mutates into an amphibian then how does a fish reproduce with that amphibian for there’s only fish and that one amphibian around not hundreds of them waiting to reproduce. A cost of sorts (there is no free lunch in evolution).

Originally Posted by cosmictraveler Originally Posted by RedPanda Originally Posted by cosmictraveler Originally Posted by RedPanda Originally Posted by cosmictraveler I can see one animal having DNA mutated but two at the exact same time is rather unusual to me. It is just another bad assumption from the viewpoint of evolution. I just cannot wrap my head around when a mutation happens and a new species is evolved just how can that happen when all there were was fish and the one amphibian. Here is a recorded instance of human chromosome number change…. His chromosomes are arranged in a stable way that could be passed on if he met a nice girl who had 44 chromosomes too. Right, thats really going to happen.So there is empirical evidence of what I am saying… (sorry knew it all the time). The man is sterile.

And this would certainly be possible in the future given his family history. Actual changes to program function require thousands of iterations of the program mutation process. Right, thats really going to happen.So there is empirical evidence of what I am saying… (sorry knew it all the time). Do you think that humans from different generations are unable to have offspring? I doubt that you do.So, why do you think that animals need to have identical mutations to be able to reproduce?Ok, so if a fishs DNA mutates into an amphibian then how does a fish reproduce with that amphibian for there’s only fish and that one amphibian around not hundreds of them waiting to reproduce.

It is not “a mutation happens and a new species is evolved”.It takes many, many mutations to evolve a fish species into an amphibian species – far more mutations than would occur over a single generation.When a fish gives birth, it gives birth to a fish.But that fish will not be exactly like it’s parents – it will be slightly different.And all the other fish that give birth at the same time will produce fish which are slightly different to their parents.What you then have is a whole generation of fish who are not exactly like their parents.And when those fish have offspring, those offspring will also be slightly different from their parents.If any of those slight differences are beneficial, then the fish with those differences will have more success at producing offspring.If any of those beneficial differences involve being able to survive longer in shallow water or being able to absorb some oxygen through their skin, then those differences would be the beginnings of a fish species evolving into an amphibian species. There might be a whole bunch of siblings all with the same mutation getting it from their mother or their father line, and they mate within the family and start the new species off like that.But for the next generation it still is line breeding from thereon in, so there must be some other mechanism that allows mating even when the parents have an unequal numbers of chromosomes.So it is a good point and I don’t know the answer. Rate of de novo mutations, father “ That is about 70 new mutations per generation.diploid number of genes involved is 5.8333×10^95.8333×10^9 x 1.2×10^-8 =70 mutations per generation…. 70 or 100, who cares as it is only an estimate.@Ethos what is a generation to you? There might be a whole bunch of siblings all with the same mutation getting it from their mother or their father line, and they mate within the family and start the new species off like that. I just cannot wrap my head around when a mutation happens and a new species is evolved just how can that happen when all there were was fish and the one amphibian.

Originally Posted by RedPanda Originally Posted by GTCethos Your number is wrong… stop posting via ignorance. The only definable difference between any program over a single iteration is whether it crashes or not. Originally Posted by cosmicytaveler Ok, so if a fishs DNA mutates into an amphibian then how does a fish reproduce with that amphibian for there’s only fish and that one amphibian around not hundreds of them waiting to reproduce. Originally Posted by Robittybob1 It could happen in animals with larger families. The moment there was a transition from 48 to 46 chromosomes the hominid no longer could breed in that population.

It could happen in animals with larger families. Here is a recorded instance of human chromosome number change…. Originally Posted by cosmictraveler Ok, so if a fishs DNA mutates into an amphibian then how does a fish reproduce with that amphibian for there’s only fish and that one amphibian around not hundreds of them waiting to reproduce. Originally Posted by GTCethos “Every human is born with more than 100 new mutations.”Your number is wrong… stop posting via ignorance. You know this may sound silly but in this case the example might be aprapo. Some of the programs will continue to run with the random change, some programs will crash with the small random change. Things like cancer and genetic disease.

This is commonly noted as genome loading. I just cannot wrap my head around when a mutation happens and a new species is evolved just how can that happen when all there were was fish and the one amphibian. What do you get with that cross?

I have never heard of that ever happening.